5 of the latest articles regarding the debate over Utah’s public lands

Utah Land

This is no doubt a heated topic, with a lot different news circulating. We thought we would round some of the most recent posts and put them in one place. As the bill progresses we will keep our readers in the know. Below are 5 articles we think are the most informative.

1. Lawmakers postpone vote on bill forcing public-lands lawsuit- After years of debate over control of Utah’s public lands, one state lawmaker wants to settle the argument by giving the attorney general’s office a hard deadline to sue the federal government for control. Keep reading.

2. Utah lawmakers OK bill forcing public lands lawsuit- A bill that would set a hard deadline for Utah to sue the federal government over public lands has cleared its first hurdle at the Utah Legislature. Senators on a natural resources committee voted 4-2 to approve the bill Wednesday afternoon. Salt Lake City Sen. Jim Dabakis sponsors the bill, which gives Attorney General Sean Reyes until June 30, 2016 to file a lawsuit. Keep reading.

3. Utah’s public lands initiative to be unveiled March 27- The much-awaited, much-touted public lands initiative dubbed the “Grand Bargain” is slated to be released in draft form March 27, along with a map that carves out land-use designations for a huge chunk of eastern Utah. Keep reading.

4. Lawmakers postpone vote on bill forcing public-lands lawsuit- After years of debate over control of Utah’s public lands, one state lawmaker wants to settle the argument by giving the attorney general’s office a hard deadline to sue the federal government for control. Keep reading.

5. State senator wants Supreme Court to settle public lands dispute in Utah- The debate is nearly as old as the state of Utah itself and one state senator is saying he wants it to end once and for all. Senate Bill 105 would put the decision of who owns about 32 million acres in public lands in the hands of the United States Supreme Court. Many say the state owns the land and they point to the Enabling Act of the Utah Constitution to prove it, but right now the federal government claims ownership and manages the land. Keep reading.